Taking time to smell the flowers

OK, I have to give credit to my wife for the idea on this one.  While visiting the Atlanta Botanical Garden this weekend, we stopped at the Cascades Garden.  Behind the beautiful pond and cascading fountain is the 25-foot-tall topiary sculpture called “Earth Goddess“.  The sculpture is always a gorgeous sight but the pond is also surrounded by many blooming plants that are interesting.

Combine the two was the obvious conclusion to be had and so, I found a composition that made it look as though the garden goddess was leaning over to take in a bunch of flowers.  It took a bit of playing with the position and depth of field to get the flowers in sharp focus and to make the face look to be just behind them.

Since the whole purpose of the gardens here is to give people the chance to see and appreciate the beauty of nature in the amazing variety of plants that are on this earth, it seemed to me to be a very appropriate image.

Atlanta Botanical Garden
Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
62mm @ f/9 – 1/160 sec – ISO 200

Elusive

Blue Jays are a strange breed.  They are so very common yet, I have been struggling to get a good shot of one.  You would think that a relatively large bird, that is usually pretty aggressive with other birds would be an easy subject but, not these guys.  They spook at the slightest breeze.  They are kind of bullies at some points but I have seen them get scared off by sparrows.

They also have a very wide variety of calls.  One of these seems to be an imitation of a hawk – maybe in hopes of scaring other birds away.  I can always tell when they are around but every time I go out to get a shot, they scatter.  While the other birds slowly return to the feeders, the Jays stay out at the edges of the yard.  They fly up to the top of the trees and if I move at all they fly off.  I got this one by setting up at a spot near the yard-favorite suet feeder and snapping a shot with my cable release.  (He flew off immediately at the sound of the shutter of course!)

As soon as I went inside, there were 3 Blue Jays lined up to get to the feeder.  They are really bid teases!

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2
280mm @ f/11 – 1/60 sec – ISO 400

Flowers of all types

The butterfly is a flying flower, the flower a tethered butterfly.

                                                                 Ponce Denis Ecouchard Lebrun

Once again, nature shows me how beauty appears in so many shapes and forms.  The colors and details of the butterfly’s wings against the flower’s petals and color is amazing.  The delicate legs and antennae, the curl of the proboscis which allows this insect to draw nectar from the flowers, all part of a little creature that we see float past on lazy summer days.

Doesn’t it just make you want to sit and wonder over the miracle that is our home?

Butterfly Encounter
Chattahoochee Nature Center
Roswell, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
250mm @ f/9 – 1/40 sec – ISO 100

Not all insects are equal

So, there are tons of different insects in the world.  Some are delicate and beautiful like this butterfly.  Some are totally bizarre and some are just plain mean.  Yesterday, I was out trying to beat back my yard which has been growing wildly with all of our rain lately.  I’m out edging with my weed whacker and suddenly, I feel a sharp pain on my leg, and my arm.  Oh great, I found a yellow jacket nest!  In case you don’t know it, these little buggers will chase you around and they bite rather than sting and will keep biting given the chance.

After I got away from there, I was silly enough to move to another part of my yard and try to continue my grounds keeping duties and found a second nest.  Ain’t I lucky!  So, I count myself lucky that I’m not severely allergic or I would have been in the hospital.  I just have several swollen and itchy spots now and I definitely prefer butterflies.

Butterfly Encounter
Chattahoochee Nature Center
Roswell, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
165mm @ f/11 – 1/125 sec – ISO 100

Just hangin’ out

It’s funny but, I think I took as many shots at the first spot we stopped in the Botanical Gardens as I did in the rest of our visit!  This turtle was sitting along the edge of the water garden by the front entrance.  At first, we weren’t sure if it was a garden decoration (statue) or if it was live.  On closer inspection, you could see him move around a little but he wasn’t about to leave his preferred spot.

I don’t think they really set it up this way on purpose but, the contrast between the mossy golden foreground and the green duckweed behind him really made a nice environment for this turtle portrait.

State Botanical Garden of Georgia
2450 S Milledge Avenue
Athens, Georgia, USA

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2
340mm @ f/11 – 1/100 sec – ISO 200

Trumpet pitchers

On Monday, I posted a shot of a dragonfly on a pitcher plant.  This is a more complete view of the plant as it is quite interesting on its own.  The plant shown is a variety of Sarracenia – North American Pitcher Plants, also known as Trumpet Pitchers.  These plants are actually meat-eaters as the pitcher of the plant traps insects and digests them.

I had seen Old-world pitchers known as Nepenthes at the Atlanta Botanical Garden before.  The Trumpet Pitchers are different in that they grow straight up from the ground where the Nepenthes pitchers are on a stalk or vine.  I was also surprised to see the flowers on these plants since I had previously though that the pitcher was a flower.  The pitchers are actually specially formed leaves.  As you can see in this shot, there are yellow flower on stalks present on the subject plant.

Nature is amazing!

State Botanical Garden of Georgia
2450 S Milledge Avenue
Athens, Georgia, USA

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2
150mm @ f/11 – 1/100 sec – ISO 200

Crimson eyes

One of the most impressive flowers from our trip to the State Botanical Garden were the very tall, very big hibiscus.  Joyce said these reminded her of the crepe paper flowers that were the fad back in the 1970’s.  These blooms were almost the size of dinner plates and had pink (as shown here) and white varieties.

The Crimson eyed Hibiscus (also known as Crimson-eyed rose-mallow or Marshmallow hibiscus) is a popular garden flower which grows naturally, in swampy wetlands.  We actually saw some of these from the boardwalk along the Chattahoochee River recently though they were not a large as this.  When I think of hibiscus, I picture the potted plants that are often used for decorations at resorts around swimming pools.  Those varieties are common in Florida but the blooms are probably a quarter the size of these giants.

Crimsoneyed Hibiscus
(Hibiscus moscheutos var. incanus)

State Botanical Garden of Georgia
2450 S Milledge Avenue
Athens, Georgia, USA

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
100mm @ f/11 – 1/250 sec – ISO 200