Gladiolus

I had not realized how difficult it is to shoot red objects until I tried with flowers.  Red just seems to be so naturally contrasty that it is hard to get it in a lighting situation without becoming all black or all white.  There just doesn’t seem to be much gray tone in here.  If there’s not much light it seems to be all shadow but bright lighting and you blast out the highlights.

I had to work to get some balance here but I thought this gladiolus bloom was worth the effort.

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
300mm @ f/7.1 – 1/320 sec – ISO 400

#macro #Gladiolus #flower #closeup #red #Roswell #Georgia #WithMyTamron

Patterns

Nature gives gifts as is sees fit.  For the House Finch, the male gets the color and the female gets patterns.  Male house finches have a red-raspberry color on their heads and upper body while the female is a somewhat drab brown.  There is a reason for this of course.  The males job is to attract a mate and to protect a territory for nesting.  The female one the other hand, needs to care for the nest which means blending in.  This is a common pattern for many birds.  The female tends the nest and does not want to attract attention.  It is a bad thing to let predators easily know where those eggs are.

As you can see here, the finch is not just a solid brown but is covered with interesting patterns which helps her blend into the background.  Seeems to be a successful strategy since my house finch family has had a whole bunch of babies at the feeders.  They are doing just fine without all that flashy color, thank you.

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Alta Pro 2+ 263AB 100 tripod
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2
600mm @ f/7.1 – 1/640sec – ISO 800

#BirdWatching #birds #HouseFinch #Roswell #Georgia #WithMyTamron

Too much green?

My yard is full of an awful lot of shades of green.  Sometimes, it seems like way too much and other times, I just see this as a brilliant display of life.  Green is my favorite color maybe because it is so representative of life and growth.  In this image, you see a cone flower newly opened.  Everything surrounding it is green and most of the flower is still green.

Soon, the petals will turn pure white and the eye will be yellow.  The color is coming but for now, the emerald tones will have to do.  With all the rain we have been getting and more on the way, I think things will stay green for a while.

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
300mm @ f/7.1 – 1/320 sec – ISO 400

#macro #ConeFlower #flower #closeup #Roswell #Georgia #WithMyTamron

Transitions

One of the things I like to watch is how nature changes over time.  This hydrangea is a beautiful study of the progression of colors that happen as the blooms appear.  You can see the little balls that are formed when the bud first emerges.  The petals come out in a yellowish – green and then the blue color seems to creep in until it is covered with that glorious pale sky-blue.

I love the contrast this presents with all the shades of pastel colors and the many different shapes and textures.  This is always an interesting plant to observe.

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
300mm @ f/9 – 1/1000 sec – ISO 400

#macro #hydrangea #flower #closeup #Roswell #Georgia #WithMyTamron

Summer’s gold

Just look at the pollen fallen off of the stamen onto the petals.  I suppose when a flower is called “Day” lily, there isn’t much time to get out there and spread the seeds.  These flowers don’t last long but they do make a lasting impression.

The shapes and colors are magnificent.  I love to get out and look at the structure of the blossoms.  There is so much texture and the color which looks to be a solid yellow has wide variation from green to brilliant yellow to almost white.  I am glad that even though the individual blooms don’t last long, the plants keep putting out flowers for a good while.  Hope to see a lot of them this season since the rain is plentiful so far.

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
300mm @ f/9 –  1/500 sec – ISO 400

#flowers #yellow #DayLily #Roswell #Georgia #WithMyTamron

Amazing detail

The closer you look at the patterns in the detail of nature, the more amazing it gets.  I love to see summer flowers appearing.  It adds so much color to the landscape.  But when you look closely, there are so many more things to see.  This white coneflower in my yard is a nice pop of contrast with its white petals and yellow eye.  Looking at it close-up, you see a patch of star-shaped fingers surrounding the yellow center.  Nature never ceases to astound me.

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
200mm @ f/7.1 –  1/800 sec – ISO 400

#bouquet #flowers #ConeFlower#Roswell #Georgia #WithMyTamron

Little birds

Quite often, we ignore the little birds.  They are always around and they bounce from one thing to another.  If they aren’t super-colorful, we don’t really notice them but they are very interesting to watch and to see up-close.

The Tufted-Titmouse seen here is one of those high-energy little birds.  They don’t stay still much and even when they stop moving from one spot to another, they are turning their heads back and forth looking for any threat.  I’m thinking this may be a juvenile bird based on how thin it looks.  But of course, that may be totally wrong.

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Alta Pro 2+ 263AB 100 tripod
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2
600mm @ f/6.3 – 1/80sec – ISO 640

#BirdWatching #birds #TuftedTitmouse #Roswell #Georgia #WithMyTamron

More woodpeckers

So, I haven’t quite been able to distinguish which one this is.  The Downy Woodpeckers in my yard have been bringing up a youngster but it is very hard to tell if I am looking at the female or the baby.  I know when I see one of the adults go to the feeders and take food back to the little one but when I see them individually, I can’t tell.  This is another case where the young get to be the size of the adults pretty quickly.  I am just glad to see that they have nested and brought about another woodpecker for me to watch.

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Alta Pro 2+ 263AB 100 tripod
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2
600mm @ f/6.3 – 1/500sec – ISO 640

#BirdWatching #birds #DownyWoodpecker #Roswell #Georgia #WithMyTamron

Splish-splash

So I got two of my favorite things at once here.  I love to watch when birds come to the bath and splash around.  In this case, one of the bluebird brood that hatched in our birdhouse is enjoying the water.  How great is that?  To add to the happiness, in the background, you can see one of my coneflowers blooming.  It’s great to see the summer perennials appearing to bring some color into the landscape.

I guess I’m ready for the Memorial Day weekend to usher in summertime after all.

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Alta Pro 2+ 263AB 100 tripod
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2
600mm @ f/6.3 – 1/400sec – ISO 640

#BirdWatching #birds #Bluebirds #Roswell #Georgia #WithMyTamron

Rare portrait

You would think a bird as common and as large as a Blue Jay would be something easy to get a picture of.  It is not so!  The jay is kind of a strange bird.  Although they are relatively large as song birds go, they are extremely skittish.  They rarely come to the bird feeder is any other birds are around.

I always know when one is around. They make all kinds of racket, trying to scare other birds away.  It is actually amazing how many different sounds they make.  One of the calls I hear often is an imitation of a hawk.  I assume that is meant to frighten the other birds so they can swoop in and have all the food to themselves.

I happened to get a few images when I walked by the window and spotted a jay planning his approach to the feeders.  He perched for a couple of nice portrait shots then went down for some food and quickly flew off.  If I had planned on getting this shot, it probably never would have happened.  Oh well, I never argue with good luck.

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Alta Pro 2+ 263AB 100 tripod
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2
450mm @ f/6.3 – 1/160sec – ISO 640

#BirdWatching #birds #BlueJay #Roswell #Georgia #WithMyTamron