Vintage New Year’s

Is Vintage – New Year an oxymoron?

I pulled together this set of vintage tin noisemakers for my New Year’s Eve image.  It seems the holidays at year-end always remind me of some of the antiques that I was lucky enough to get from my grandparents.  It’s not the big things but the little ones like this that bring back memories for me and I think that’s how it should be.

Thinking back over the past year, I am grateful for all the blessings I have seen, big and little.  I hope that the year to come will be filled with many more and that I will we all will be able to see and appreciate those blessings when they happen.

Best wishes for a Happy and Healthy New Year to you all !

Vintage tin New Year’s noise makers
Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Nikon 105mm f/2.8 AF Micro-Nikkor
105mm @ f/22 –  5 sec – ISO 160

CARGOES a grand Adventure and Travel game

Continuing with my macro of game pieces theme, this is another vintage board game that I inherited from my grandparents.  Cargoes is a board game introduced by Selchow and Righter in 1934 which involves trying to earn the highest amount by delivering cargo to distant ports.  Each player chooses one of the four metal cargo ships and navigates around the board picking up and delivering cargo.

It is very interesting to look at games like this and see what has changed over time.  For example, the cargoes in the game include Ivory from Africa and Turtles from the Galapagos.  Unless the game was changed to SMUGGLERS, I don’t think this would play too well in today’s world view.

The artwork is by  William Llowyn Longyear (1899-1980) an artist, author and professor who was one of the most well-known and prolific game designers of the period.  A beautiful Art-Deco style map of the world is the playing board.

See below for some more views of the game.

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Long before Professor Plum there was Mr. Ree the Fireside Detective

One of my Christmas gifts this year was a deck of cards with photography ideas.  The first one I picked up on was for macro photography with the idea of using game pieces as a subject.  I went poking about in the basement and found some old board games that I got from my grandparents.  This one has some wonderful graphics that I thought would be interesting but it also has a neat story behind it.

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Mr. Ree is a Murder Mystery board game introduced by Selchow and Righter in 1937.  This was the first of its kind in a line of very popular mystery games which include Clue! (Which was originally released in England as Cluedo in 1949).

If you are familiar with Clue, it is easy to see the similarities.  The game board is set as rooms in a house, with players taking on the roles of characters in the story.  There are also game pieces for the murder weapon.  Mr. Ree is different in that there are no dice involved (all game play is determined by the draw of cards) and the murderer and victim are decided during the game.  Where Clue has a pre-determined answer, Mr. Ree is a guessing game that depends on the luck of the draw and the wits of the players.

Mr. Ree was hugely popular and remained on the market until the late 1950’s.  There were several versions including the original 1937 (square box) a 1938 update to include a game board, a 1946 version in green packaging and a 1957 version with a complete revamp of the design.  The game set that I have has a copyright of 1946 but is in the blue and gold package that came out in 1938 (prior to the 1946 green box).  Fortunately, my grandparents were very good at keeping thing carefully and the game still has all the cards and game pieces.

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Winter Color

One of the few plants that stand up to colder weather and keep some color in the landscape is this ornamental cabbage.  Getting close to the plant reveals a depth of color and texture that is missing from most of the bleak surroundings.

I processed this image with Nik software Color Effects Pro 4 filters to make the detail and contrast stand out.

Smith House Plantation
935 Alpharetta Highway
Roswell, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Tamron 16-300 Di II VC PZD Macro
185mm @ f/6.3 –  1/160 sec – ISO 200

Open-hearth Cooking

I have fond memories of cooking over a campfire back in the days when I was a Boy Scout but, can you imagine this as your everyday kitchen?  This image includes common implements used in open-hearth cooking. Lots of cast iron as you can see.

This time of year, the idea of cooking before an open fire may seem very cozy.  The warmth of the fire with pots bubbling and mouth-watering aromas wafting about sounds great.  I’m sure it wouldn’t be so much fun in the middle of the summer though.  The kitchen was a separate building in plantation homes such as this.  I imagine that may have been to isolate the heat as much as to avoid setting fire to the main dwelling.  Still, the image of preparing holiday meals here makes me wish I could experience it first-hand.

Smith House Plantation
935 Alpharetta Highway
Roswell, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Tamron 16-300 Di II VC PZD Macro
58mm @ f/5 –  1/15 sec – ISO 800

Who’s ready for breakfast?

As a leading family in Roswell, the Smith’s only had the fancy packaged hominy for their grits!  This is one of the old shipping crates that is on display in one of the side buildings at the Smith Plantation.  It just seemed to be to be a great reminder of the time when our country was transitioning from an agricultural society to one based on manufactured goods.

Smith House Plantation
935 Alpharetta Highway
Roswell, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Tamron 16-300 Di II VC PZD Macro
52mm @ f/5 –  1/6 sec – ISO 200

Merry Christmas

I send out my prayers and best wishes to all on this Christmas Day.  May you all spend this day celebrating with friends and family and give thanks for blessings that we all share.  To those who are struggling with any hardships this season, my wish is for you to find healing and peace during this holiest of times.

God Bless us, one and all!

Smith House Plantation
935 Alpharetta Highway
Roswell, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Tamron 16-300 Di II VC PZD Macro
38mm @ f/4.5 –  1/6 sec – ISO 200