Hilton Head Island sunrise reflections

Wish I could always start my day like this.  You have to get up early, but it is worth it!

My favorite part of our stay at Hilton Head was when we would walk over to the beach and watch the sun rise.  At this particular time, the tide was out and the color of the sky and the clouds overhead were reflected in the water on the beach.  It’s almost like having two sunrises at the same time.

Hilton Head Island
Palmetto Dunes Beach Park

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
16mm @ f/16 – 1/3 sec – ISO 100

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The REAL Hilton Head Lighthouse

Here’s a trivia question for people who have visited Hilton Head Island – Where can you find the Hilton Head lighthouse?  If you answered Harbour Town, you are only partly correct.  The well known Harbour Town Light was privately built as part of Harbour Town Marina and Sea Pines Plantation.

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Harbour Town Light

There is another lighthouse on Hilton Head that most people don’t know about.  Officially, it is called the Hilton Head Range Rear Light  and it is located on Hole 15 of the Arthur Hills Golf Course in the Leamington section of the Palmetto Dunes Resort.

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Leamington Light and Oil House

It is quite an unusual and historic lighthouse but is out of the way and so, not very well known.  The remaining structure is the interior cast-iron skeleton of what was once a wooden-clad tower that would look more like the traditional lights that we are used to.  The tower is called the “Rear” light because there were originally two towers.  The front light no longer exists but when operational, ships would line up beams from the two lights to give them an exact location when navigating the channel of Port Royal Sound.

The rear tower still stands along with the original brick Oil House.  The keeper’s house was moved and now is in Harbour Town near the more famous of Hilton Head’s lights.

 

To get to the lighthouse, you need to gain entrance to the Leamington neighborhood with is gated and requires special permission to enter.  We were staying in the Palmetto Dunes resort and got a pass to get in and view the light but we wouldn’t have known it exists if we hadn’t read about it.  The light is not on the shoreline and is not visible from a distance.  We actually drove right by it when we first went in so, you really have to know where to look in order to find it.

Hilton Head Range Rear Light
(a.k.a. Leamington Light)
Arthur Hills Golf Course
Palmetto Dunes – Leamington
Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
38mm @ f/11 – 1/200 sec – ISO 200

Hay, I’m hungry!

Baby birds fall into one of two categories – 1. Cute little balls of fluff and 2. Weird, gangly, bizarre looking creatures.  In the case of tri-colored herons, they fall into the second category at least until the feathers come in.  The rookery at Pinckney Island had a lot of odd looking chicks and a smaller number of cute ones.

It was also full of birds fighting over territory and protecting the nests.  It is amazing, with all the birds that flock to the same place to nest, that any of them survive all the squabbling that goes on but somehow, they seem to do OK.  The rookery is also surrounded by marsh and swampland that is home to a fair number of alligators.  I would have thought there would be a better spot for birds to raise their young but they come back every year.

Juvenile Tri-Colored Heron
(Egretta tricolor)

Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge
Bluffton, SC

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2
600mm @ f/16 – 1/100 sec – ISO 400

Shelter Cove Harbour

There was a beautiful sunset at the Harbor across from Palmetto Dunes.  We had gone out to dinner and saw the color start to tint the horizon and went over to see what it looked like.  At first, we thought we had missed it but then the sky turned orange and things were really nice.  It was a great way to spend our last evening on Hilton Head.

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
16mm @ f/13 – 1/5 sec – ISO 400

Common Gallinule

Here’s a question for the bird nerds out there: What bird has a call that sounds like a kids bicycle horn?  This image is just that bird.  We spotted a number of them wading in the marshy area surrounding the ibis rookery at Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge near Hilton Head Island.

The water surrounding the rookery was coated with some kind of green material which also covers the birds legs as you see it standing near the shoreline here.  The most viewed birds in this area are actually egrets, ibis and herons but the Gallinule was closer to shore and just looked neat against that green carpet of the water.  I love getting to know birds that I hadn’t been familiar with before!

Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge
Bluffton, SC

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2
600mm @ f/16 – 1/100 sec – ISO 400

Wedding Venue detail

Hopkins Farm in Simpsonville, SC is on the National Register of Historic Places

One of my favorite things to do on wedding shoots is look for little details that will bring back memories for the couple and their guests.  This past weekend, I went to do a wedding with my son-in-law at Hopkins Farm, a historic site near Greenville, South Carolina.

The grounds are full of all those things that make a farm a farm.  Barns, agricultural implements, chicken coops and all kinds of other bits and pieces of farm life.  The home and out-buildings that are used to host weddings and events are all beautiful and modern but the grounds are working farm all the way.

I had a great time getting to know the families of the bride and groom and wandering around all the fantastic surroundings on this farm.  Great way to spend part of my holiday weekend!

Timberock at Hopkins Farm
3717 Fork Shoals Road
Simpsonville, SC

Nikon D7100
Tamron 16-300 Di II VC PZD Macro
70mm @ f/5.3 – 1/25 sec – ISO 125