Water of Gold

One of the many falls along the Tallulah River passing through the Gorge is this section called L’Eau d’Or – French for Water of Gold.  This is a view from Overlook #3 on the North Rim trail.

I assume that the name comes from the sun reflecting off the pool above the falls.  You can see a little bit of a golden ring in this image.  Not quite sure why it was named in French but, uncovering mysteries is one of the most interesting things about visiting beautiful places like this.  If anybody knows the history behind this name, let me know!

L’Eau d’Or Falls
Tallulah Gorge State Park
Tallulah Falls, Georgia, USA

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
16mm @ f/11 – 1/40 sec – ISO 200

Across the Gorge

A view of the suspension bridge that crosses Tallulah Gorge from the North to the South rim.  This structure hangs 80 feet above the floor of the gorge and gives you a great view up and down the valley.  It is definitely one of those bridges that will sway when people cross it.  If you walk alone over the span it’s easy to control the swinging but when others are passing by, it can quickly get into seasickness territory.

For our visit last weekend, this was the end-point of our descent.  After stopping here, we crossed to the South side and then walked back up the stairs.  The climb was not what I would call easy but it was certainly worth it!  I would love to go back and get a pass to go down to the floor but that’s something we would want to plan as a whole day trip.

I’m sure there are lots of great photo opportunities to view the gorge from the bottom up and to get in close to the falls.  Need to put this on my calendar for when the weather cools off a bit.

Tallulah Gorge State Park
Tallulah Falls, Georgia, USA

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
16mm @ f/11 – 1/60 sec – ISO 200

Black Rock Lake

Who knew there was a lake in Black Rock Mountain State Park?  If we hadn’t happened across a Park Ranger, I don’t think we would have even heard of it.  The man-made lake, constructed in 1974, is off of Taylor’s Chapel Road which is the intersection that you get to right before the big sign for the park.

Tallulah August-6766
The turn for Taylor’s Chapel Road is right before this sign.

If you turn right at this intersection onto Taylor’s Chapel Road, you can follow the dirt road out to where the lake is.  This is really a peaceful spot which does not appear to get many visitors.  The parking lot will only take a handful of cars so, don’t plan any big events here!

From what I read, the lake is stocked with trout and you can fish here as long as you have a valid Georgia fishing license.  There is also a small waterfall which I didn’t actually get to see.  The falls are on Greasy Creek but you must have to take a trail that isn’t well marked to get to them.  I found Greasy Creek and it had some cascading water which I incorrectly though was the “falls”.  I guess we need to make another trip so I can see the real thing.

Black Rock Lake
Black Rock Mountain State Park
Mountain City, Georgia, USA

2-frame panorama merged in Adobe Lightroom
Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
16mm @ f/8 – 1/250 sec – ISO 200

Ada-Hi Falls

Ada-Hi Falls (pronounced Uh-dah`’he) located within Black Rock Mountain State Park in Rabun County, Georgia is the highest elevation waterfall in the state.  Unfortunately, when a waterfall is this high in the mountains, there isn’t much water coming down so it’s more of a trickle than a rushing falls.

It is easy to get to the falls if you know where to look.  A short hike down a fairly steep stairway brings you to the observation deck where you can get right next to the falls. The the quarter-mile Ada-Hi Trail is surrounded by mountain laurel, which may well be why the place got its name which is Cherokee for “forest”.

Tallulah August-6737

Though it is no spectacular drop of vast amounts of water, this serene little waterfall was a pleasant find.  It is always nice to come across new things when visiting our State Parks.  I also believe that there is a great amount of beauty in the small things in life when we take the time to appreciate them.

Ada-Hi Falls
Black Rock Mountain State Park
Mountain City, Georgia, USA

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
16mm @ f/14 – 1/2 sec – ISO 400

Dell of the War Woman

After visiting Black Rock Mountain for sunrise pictures, the group from North Georgia Photography Club went out to find Becky Branch Falls.  This beautiful little waterfall is part of the Warwoman Dell Recreation Area, located in the Chattahoochee National Forest, just east of Clayton, Georgia.Black Rock_May 28 2016_0094

Warwoman Dell is named for a Cherokee woman from this area, who was respected by Indian and settlers and advised to the Cherokee tribal council on war and peace.  From Warwoman Dell, we followed the Bartram Trail in search of Becky Branch Falls.

Black Rock_May 28 2016_0105
William Bartram is known as the first native-born American naturalist/artist.  At the time of the American Revolution, Bartram made a journey throughout the Southeast – from the Carolinas, through Georgia and into Florida and also west through Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana as far as the Mississippi River.

Our group made the way up Bartram Trail up a short switch back path which then crosses over Warwoman Road to get to the falls.  After crawling over a four-foot in diameter tree that is fallen over the trail, we arrived at the falls.Black Rock_May 28 2016_0139

 

 

 

The falls cascade down a rocky slope surrounded by native azalea and rhododendron and towering pine trees.  There is a small bridge over the creek that was ideal for getting images of the falls but could only accommodate 4 or 5 photographers at a time.Black Rock_May 28 2016_0115

This was a lovely outing and I really enjoyed meeting and getting to know the members of the North Georgia Photography Club.  A wonderful group and excellent hosts – Thanks to all of you!!

Once again, all of these images were taken with my new,
Tamron SP 10-24mm  f/3.5-4.5 Di II.

#WithMyTamron