Greasy Creek

When we visited Black Rock Mountain State Park a couple of weeks ago, we went looking for a waterfall that is on Greasy Creek near Black Rock Lake.  The image shown here was what I saw of the creek, which has a number of little cascades which I took to be what people said were the “falls”.  Apparently, there are actually some true waterfalls nearby but I missed the path for that.

It was nice to wander the pathways around the lake and admire the little stream flowing through groves of mountain laurel.  The woods were pleasantly shady and cool on a hot August day and the walk was enjoyable even though we didn’t locate the falls we were looking for.  Maybe we can make an autumn trip back up here and see it again when the leaves are changing.  I think that would be a fantastic opportunity for some nice landscapes.

 

Greasy Creek
Black Rock Mountain State Park
Mountain City, Georgia, USA

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
16mm @ f/18 – 1.3 sec – ISO 640

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Slipper Orchid

The orchid center at the Atlanta Botanical Garden is full of many different types of orchids and other exotic plants.  These slipper orchids really look as if some tiny person could slip them on their feet and walk off into the forest in high style.

I love seeing the fantastic variety of shapes and colors that the orchid family is made up of.  All the beautiful plants at the gardens are a pleasure to experience.  It is a true joy to spend time here and marvel at the wonders of nature and be glad to have the chance to share in this amazing planet we live on.

Atlanta Botanical Garden
Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
100mm @ f/11 – 1/100 sec – ISO 400

Tending the flowers

I love to see the beauty of flowers on a Summer’s day but when you add butterflies to the mix, it is hard to get anything better.  It is so interesting to watch them poking through the flowers in search of nectar and then leaving with a coating of pollen to carry on to the next flower.  Nature has such an amazing way of joining things together.  The flower provides for the insects and the insects make it possible for the flowers to reproduce.

The circle of life is pretty cool!

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
(Papilio glaucus)

Atlanta Botanical Garden
Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
100mm @ f/11 – 1/250 sec – ISO 100

Blue bird of Happiness

I definitely need to get out and do some more birding soon.  The weather has been pretty miserably hot but I need some more pictures like this.  My backyard has been a great source of interesting birds like this cheerful little blue bird.  I wish I had the great variety that David Akoubian gets up in the mountains but my suburban feathered-friends are a great joy to watch.

I’m hoping that summer relents a bit and it won’t be too long until we can start thinking about fall again but, 90+ degree days are still here for a while, I’m afraid.  I guess I will just need to find some shady spots to watch from and enjoy what nature brings.

Eastern Bluebird
(Sialia sialis)
Roswell, Georgia, USA

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2
600mm @ f/6.3 – 1/125 sec – ISO 640

Time to put the glasses back on

I posted a right out of the camera shot of the “diamond ring” phenomenon on Monday and thought a little more editing was in order.  This is another view (cropped a bit to show more detail of the corona) of the starburst that is produced on either side of the total eclipse.  When the moon covers almost all of the sun but there’s a bit peeking out from the corner just like when the sun rises over the horizon.

You can see once again, that we were experiencing cloud cover which was kind of a neat addition during totality.  The eclipsed sun was surrounded by a bank of clouds and made it look as if it was floating on them.  It was also quite interesting to see that when the thicker clouds moved in everything got even darker than it was with the total eclipse in spite of the sun coming back out.

We missed the phases of the moon passing back away from the sun because of the clouds but the total eclipse was the real show.  It was totally amazing!

2017 Total Eclipse
Young Harris, Georgia, USA

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2
600mm @ f/9 – 1/250 sec – ISO 800

Along the way

As we were walking the Waterfall Trail at Cloudland Canyon, the sweeping views of mountains and forest and waterfalls called out for attention.  At the same time, there were many smaller voices calling that were easy to miss like these yellow flowers.  The local inhabitants (bees) didn’t miss them but I’m sure most hikers went right by without even noticing.

Another case of how much we can miss when not paying attention.  I guess you can say: “Don’t sweat the small stuff” but, I also say – don’t miss out on the small stuff that might be really cool.  Hope you notice some small detail today that brings a smile.

Cloudland Canyon State Park
Rising Fawn, Georgia, USA

Nikon D7100
hand-held
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
86mm @ f/11 – 1/25 sec – ISO 400

Enjoying the Falls

One more image to share from Cloudland Canyon as we head into the next weekend.  You can see here how Cherokee Falls attracts people to approach more closely.  It’s not a smooth path to get in there but that’s part of experiencing nature up-close.

Once again, this reminds me of how beautiful and enjoyable it is to be outdoors appreciating how amazing our world is.  At the same time, I see all the reminders of how people fail to take simple precautions and abide by rules meant to keep them safe.  I heard a report recently of someone who actually died by slipping and falling in a similar setting.  A little respect for the fact that there are dangers in the wild goes a long way toward us keeping these places enjoyable and safe for all.

Hope you all get out and enjoy some of our natural wonders this weekend.

Cloudland Canyon State Park
Rising Fawn, Georgia, USA

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
16mm @ f/10 – 1/15 sec – ISO 640