Dan Lawson’s place Cades Cove

Dan Lawson’s Place is the second oldest of the historic cabins that remain standing in Cades Cove.  Built around 1840, this was the home of the cove’s wealthiest resident.  Only the John Oliver cabin (1822), home of the cove’s first European settler, is older than this one.

Cades Cove was first settled during the 1700’s by Cherokee Indians and is named after a Chief Kade. The first European settlers came during the 1800’s eventually reaching a population of 671 around 1850.

In the 1920’s the residents were forced out when the State of Tennessee gave the Park Commission power to seize the cove properties and make them part of the National Park system.

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
22mm @ f/10 – 1/50 sec – ISO 100

Barnsley Gardens

After visiting the Lindale Mill with Roswell Photographic Society, a few of us went over to get lunch and stroll around Barnsley Gardens.  The Barnsley Resort and Spa in Adairsville, features golf, horseback riding and beautiful grounds to relax in and enjoy.

The ruins of the original Barnsley manor, named “Woodlands” are featured in my image here.  Built in the 1850’s by the wealthy cotton and sea merchant, Godfrey Barnsley, the Italinanate mansion is one of the most memorable feature of the resort.  The story goes that Barnsley built the mansion for his wife Julia who became sick and passed away before the construction was finished.  He felt called by her spirit to finish the building and it became the family residence for several generations before falling into ruin after having been hit by a tornado.

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
44mm @ f/14 – 1/50 sec – ISO 200

A different Lindale Mill

After my visit to the Lindale textile mill with the Roswell Photographic Society, I was introduced to another mill nearby.  A few of the group were going over to Barnsley Gardens after seeing the abandoned mill.  Gittel Price, who had been out to this site previously, said – why don’t we go over to the “Old” mill?  So we set off and went all the way across the main road and stopped again.

The Old Lindale Mill is an antebellum, brick grist mill.  The structure was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993 and is remarkable for being one of only a few surviving mills of this era.  The mill originally built in the 1830’s, was destroyed during the Civil War and then re-built by it’s owner Captain Jacob H. Hoss.  It has been known by several names: Hoss’s Mill, Jones Mill, Silver Creek Mill, and Folly Mill and is now known as the Old Brick Mill.

The place is very peaceful and a great site to visit.  If you should happen to stop here, be careful of the white goose who seems to be the ruler of the mill pond.  You may get chased off if the goose does not think you are showing enough respect!

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
38mm @ f/14 – 1/160 sec – ISO 800

Sunday morning

It’s Sunday morning and I thought this was a good image to post before I run out to cantor at two consecutive masses this morning.  The Cathedral of St Augustine is full of stained glass but I really liked this one window which had sunlight streaming in through it.  The little streaks of color were dancing around in the cove of this window and made it fantastically beautiful.

Pray for me, that my voice doesn’t give out and I will pray for you for a great week to come.

Cathedral Basilica of St. Augustine
St. Augustine, Florida
Nikon D7100
Sirui P-204S Monopod
Tamron 16-300 Di II VC PZD Macro
16mm @ f8 –  1/125 sec – ISO 800

Gold doubloons

The Pirate Museum in St Augustine has a second focus which is Treasure.  Though the main draw is the swashbuckling adventures of the pirates, there is much history and many artifacts centered around the booty they sought to claim on the high seas.  This image features some of the recovered coin of the day.

It is very interesting to read and view the stories that they have about how much treasure was pirated and how many shipwrecks occurred in the waters off of Florida.  I’m sure there is still a lot of gold, silver and other precious materials laying along the reefs and on the ocean floor in those waters.  That’s part of the allure that draws so many to view the treasures collected here.  Yo ho, yo ho, a pirates life for me!

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron 16-300 Di II VC PZD Macro
110mm @ f8 –  1/500 sec – ISO 2500

Medici Lion of St Augustine

One of the most famous landmarks in St Augustine, Florida is the Bridge of Lions which connects downtown to Anastasia Island where we stayed on our visit.  The bridge spans the Intercoastal Waterway and  Matanzas Bay and is part of the A-1-A highway along Florida’s east coast.

Known as “The Most Beautiful Bridge in Dixie”, the structure was completed in 1927.  The marble lions, a copy of the ancient design which graced the Villa de Medici in Rome, were gifts of  Dr. Andrew Anderson (1839–1924), the builder of the Markland House, who spent the last decade of his life putting works of art in public places in the Ancient City.

The Bridge of Lions – St Augustine, Florida
Nikon D7100
Tamron 16-300 Di II VC PZD Macro
70mm @ f8 –  1/800 sec – ISO 200

Ring the bell

The Roswell Photographic Society wrapped up its annual pilgrimage to the Historic Homes of Roswell with a visit to Barrington Hall.  This image shows a desk with a black felt top and a variety of vintage knick-knacks including a group of little bells.  I don’t know if these are the kind that would be rung to summon servants or if they are just little decorations but I love the patterns and patina on the old objects.

I had to play with lighting this scene since the room was fairly dark and they don’t allow flash photography here.  This is a long exposure (15 seconds) and I used my pocket LED light to selectively brighten some sections while keeping an overall dark feeling.

It is fun to walk through this historic home and see all the household objects representing hundreds of years of life in the south.  Lots of this reminds me of visits to my grandparents homes.  Some of the artifacts are much older but everything here has a sense of the past and makes you wonder what it must have been like to live in this home.  A neat place to visit and a great spot for photographic inspiration.

Barrington Hall – Roswell, Georgia
Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
ProMaster LED120SS light
Nikon 105mm f/2.8 AF Micro-Nikkor
105mm @ f/22 –  15 sec – ISO 200