Whale Shark

If you have not been to the Georgia Aquarium, one of their largest attractions are the whale sharks like the one seen here.  They have a viewing area that they call the WOW room where you can see these immense creatures swim by along with many other fish, sharks, rays and occasionally, divers.  Whale shark is the largest of all fishes. You can really get the scale of how big this is by comparing to the diver in the lower center part of this shot.

The bubbles you see rising through the tank are other divers who were also there at the time.  Part of the exhibit is to feed and care for the residents of the tank.  They even have radios to talk with the divers while they are in the tank.  It really is incredible to see this undersea world so close up.

Ocean Voyager Exhibit
Georgia Aquarium – Atlanta, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Sirui P-204S Monopod
Nikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G
35mm @ f/3.2 –  1/40 sec – ISO 250

Advertisements

Bignose Unicornfish

The Unicornfish is one of the larger fish (Maximum length of 21.5 inches) in the Pacific Barrier Reef exhibit of the Tropical Diver gallery at the Georgia Aquarium.  These fish are native to the Indian and Pacific oceans.  They display a large blue marking on the nose and blue spots and stripes across the body but often change color based on the environment or when threatened.

Unicornfish are also known as Surgeonfish or Lancetfish because of a blade like spine in and two hook-like plates along the tail, which are used for defense and are as sharp as a surgeons scalpel.

BIGNOSE UNICORNFISH
(Naso vlamingii)

Georgia Aquarium Tropical Diver Exhibit
Nikon D7100
Sirui P-204S Monopod
Nikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G
35mm @ f/8 –  1/50 sec – ISO 320

BLACK SPOT PIRANHA

The piranha exhibit always seems to be popular at the aquarium.  I think people like to flirt with danger.  We are drawn toward the things that we would not approach in the wild as long as there is a secure barrier between us.

For the most part, these fish were easily startled and didn’t stay still for long.  In a few cases one like this, would remain stationary for a while.  Maybe they were checking out the lunch menu?

Georgia Aquarium River Scout Exhibit
Nikon D7100
Sirui P-204S Monopod
Nikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G
35mm @ f/2.2 –  1/20 sec – ISO 250

Red Lionfish

It looks pretty but the fins on their backs are dangerous.  The Red Lionfish is one of the most venomous of all fishes.  Its venom causes a severe reaction in humans including intense pain, inflammation and, occasionally, serious systemic symptoms such as respiratory distress. A lionfish “sting” is rarely fatal.

Native to the Eastern Indian and Pacific Oceans, the lionfish has been introduced into the Atlantic. The first documented release of red lionfish into the Atlantic occurred in 1992 when Hurricane Andrew destroyed a large private aquarium in a house in South Florida and six lionfish escaped into Biscayne Bay.  The fish have been reported to be living from as far north as New York, down to Florida and even into the Caribbean.

Lionfish are considered an invasive species and methods to control and remove them from Atlantic waters are underway.  With no natural enemies and a huge appetite, the lionfish have made life difficult for native fish in Florida and Caribbean waters.  They are beautiful in an aquarium but in the waters of the Atlantic, they are a big problem.

Georgia Aquarium Tropical Diver Exhibit
Nikon D7100
Sirui P-204S Monopod
Nikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G
35mm @ f/4 –  1/20 sec – ISO 400

Teeth

I went down to the Georgia Aquarium to join up with the North Georgia Photo Club.  One thing I have to say is: Go to the Aquarium sometime other than the weekend!  There are lots of amazing things to see but when the place is crowded, it’s a zoo.  (You know what I mean.)

I saw this African Tigerfish in the River Scout section.  Those teeth are pretty serious looking.  I don’t think this one will be in the petting section.

Nikon D7100
Sirui P-204S Monopod
Nikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G
35mm @ f/7.1 –  1/60 sec – ISO 200