Hay, I’m hungry!

Baby birds fall into one of two categories – 1. Cute little balls of fluff and 2. Weird, gangly, bizarre looking creatures.  In the case of tri-colored herons, they fall into the second category at least until the feathers come in.  The rookery at Pinckney Island had a lot of odd looking chicks and a smaller number of cute ones.

It was also full of birds fighting over territory and protecting the nests.  It is amazing, with all the birds that flock to the same place to nest, that any of them survive all the squabbling that goes on but somehow, they seem to do OK.  The rookery is also surrounded by marsh and swampland that is home to a fair number of alligators.  I would have thought there would be a better spot for birds to raise their young but they come back every year.

Juvenile Tri-Colored Heron
(Egretta tricolor)

Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge
Bluffton, SC

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2
600mm @ f/16 – 1/100 sec – ISO 400

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Common Gallinule

Here’s a question for the bird nerds out there: What bird has a call that sounds like a kids bicycle horn?  This image is just that bird.  We spotted a number of them wading in the marshy area surrounding the ibis rookery at Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge near Hilton Head Island.

The water surrounding the rookery was coated with some kind of green material which also covers the birds legs as you see it standing near the shoreline here.  The most viewed birds in this area are actually egrets, ibis and herons but the Gallinule was closer to shore and just looked neat against that green carpet of the water.  I love getting to know birds that I hadn’t been familiar with before!

Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge
Bluffton, SC

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2
600mm @ f/16 – 1/100 sec – ISO 400