Morgan County Courthouse

For some reason, my visit to Morgan county, where my daughter and son-in-law have just moved, had me focusing on the local architecture.  The most prominent building in downtown Madison, Georgia is the Morgan County Courthouse.  The  neoclassical revival structure was built in 1905 and is believed to be the third county courthouse that has been constructed.

It was nice to get this image just a few days before Independence Day since the town square, including the courthouse was decorated with American flags all around.

Morgan County Court House
Madison, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
26mm @ f/8 – 1/1250 sec – ISO 800

Dixie King Cotton – Shed House No 3

I only got to look around for  a little while at the buildings from Dixie King Cotton company that still stand along the main street in Bostwick, Georgia.  Cotton was truly king throughout much of the South and was the main contributor to the establishment and growth of this town.

Small portions of the cotton business continue to operate in Bostwick but the original company started to diminish around the period of World War I and never recovered.  I need to get back here when I have more time and really explore.  It is a great little piece of Georgia history.

Dixie King Cotton Shed House No 3
Bostwick, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
50mm @ f/8 – 1/320 sec – ISO 200

Cotton Gin – Bostwick, GA

This weekend, we were immersed in small-town southern culture when we went to visit my daughter, Megan and her husband, Ryan’s new home in Bostwick, Georgia.  They decided to look for a place outside the built-up suburbs where they could get some land and enjoy nature and this was it!

Bostwick is a small town in Morgan County, just North of Madison, Georgia.  If you don’t know where this is, it’s kind of in the middle of nowhere – between I-20 and Athens. In the mid-1880’s John Bostwick, Sr., a local boy, started buying land in this area for cotton farming.  He continued to expand his land holdings and the business thrived.  At it’s peak in the 1920’s the town had two cotton gins, a cotton seed oil mill, a depot and train station, a bank, a hotel, a dry cleaning business, three doctors, a blacksmith shop, post office, and three businesses with gas pumps.

The building in this image is a remnant of that golden age of King Cotton.  This operating Lummus Cotton Gin continues to connect Bostwick to it’s past.  Every fall, they have a Cotton Gin Festival, celebrating that history and inviting people to come see what small-town Georgia was like.

Dixie King Cotton Gin
Bostwick, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
18mm @ f/8 – 1/320 sec – ISO 200

How’s it look outside?

These twin smokestacks coming from massive industrial boilers are the main landmark of the Lindale Mill plant. This is a view is from the other main building that housed the weaving and dying machinery through a transom window with painted-over green windows.

It it easy to imagine what this must have looked like when the plant was operational.  This was certainly a hub of activity, with people and machines buzzing away.  Now, it’s a ghost town except for the occasional group of photographers and workers cleaning out the broken and abandoned bits of the old facility.

This is quite a piece of history and one of those things that can serve to remind us of the past.  I hope that it continues to be a place for people to go and connect to how things were in days gone by.

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 10-24mm F/3.5-4.5 Di II
10mm @ f/16 – 1/125 sec – ISO 100

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Dan Lawson’s place Cades Cove

Dan Lawson’s Place is the second oldest of the historic cabins that remain standing in Cades Cove.  Built around 1840, this was the home of the cove’s wealthiest resident.  Only the John Oliver cabin (1822), home of the cove’s first European settler, is older than this one.

Cades Cove was first settled during the 1700’s by Cherokee Indians and is named after a Chief Kade. The first European settlers came during the 1800’s eventually reaching a population of 671 around 1850.

In the 1920’s the residents were forced out when the State of Tennessee gave the Park Commission power to seize the cove properties and make them part of the National Park system.

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
22mm @ f/10 – 1/50 sec – ISO 100

Barnsley Gardens

After visiting the Lindale Mill with Roswell Photographic Society, a few of us went over to get lunch and stroll around Barnsley Gardens.  The Barnsley Resort and Spa in Adairsville, features golf, horseback riding and beautiful grounds to relax in and enjoy.

The ruins of the original Barnsley manor, named “Woodlands” are featured in my image here.  Built in the 1850’s by the wealthy cotton and sea merchant, Godfrey Barnsley, the Italinanate mansion is one of the most memorable feature of the resort.  The story goes that Barnsley built the mansion for his wife Julia who became sick and passed away before the construction was finished.  He felt called by her spirit to finish the building and it became the family residence for several generations before falling into ruin after having been hit by a tornado.

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
44mm @ f/14 – 1/50 sec – ISO 200

A different Lindale Mill

After my visit to the Lindale textile mill with the Roswell Photographic Society, I was introduced to another mill nearby.  A few of the group were going over to Barnsley Gardens after seeing the abandoned mill.  Gittel Price, who had been out to this site previously, said – why don’t we go over to the “Old” mill?  So we set off and went all the way across the main road and stopped again.

The Old Lindale Mill is an antebellum, brick grist mill.  The structure was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993 and is remarkable for being one of only a few surviving mills of this era.  The mill originally built in the 1830’s, was destroyed during the Civil War and then re-built by it’s owner Captain Jacob H. Hoss.  It has been known by several names: Hoss’s Mill, Jones Mill, Silver Creek Mill, and Folly Mill and is now known as the Old Brick Mill.

The place is very peaceful and a great site to visit.  If you should happen to stop here, be careful of the white goose who seems to be the ruler of the mill pond.  You may get chased off if the goose does not think you are showing enough respect!

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
38mm @ f/14 – 1/160 sec – ISO 800