Pink Hyacinth

OK, so there are a few spring flowers blooming.  I captured this beautiful pink hyacinth on my walk around Smith Plantation on Sunday.  I love this kind of flower that is a bundle of mini-blooms which from a distance look like one big blossom.  The closer you get, the more you appreciate the individual flowers.

As I continue to explore the macro world, I am constantly amazed at the intricate shapes that make up small things.  The colors and curves that make each of these little flowers are a wonder to look at and make me appreciate the fantastic variety that is here in the world around us.  Whether it is vast landscapes or tiny microcosms, God’s handiwork is awesome!

Archibald Smith Plantation Home – Roswell, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Nikon 105mm f/2.8 AF Micro-Nikkor
105mm @ f/20 –  1/100 sec – ISO 400

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Details

One of the few plants that seem to have weathered the frost of last week are the hellebores.  I saw these blooming at Smith Plantation weeks ago and they are still thriving now.  Where most of the early Spring bloomers were withered by the cold weather, these beauties don’t seem to mind.  It is nice to see that not everything got crushed by the cold snap.

In this image, I decided to focus on just a small section of the petals to get the pattern and color as well as the detail of the veining.  Set against the bright spring-green behind it, I thought this made an interesting combination.

Helleborus ‘Ivory Prince’
Archibald Smith Plantation Home – Roswell, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Nikon 105mm f/2.8 AF Micro-Nikkor
105mm @ f/20 –  1/20 sec – ISO 400

Vintage-style radio

Although I don’t think this is really an antique radio, it has the look and with this black & white version, I think it looks like a step back in history.  The Archibald Smith Plantation Home in Roswell dates back to the beginning of the town.  Built in 1838 and occupied by the Smith family for almost 150 years, the interior contains a wide variety of pieces from that history.  Some of the furnishings are original pieces that the family and servants used and some were added when the home was converted into a museum.

Every time I go here I see something different.  It is a great place to dig into local history and experience what southern life was like for the founders of Roswell from the beginning, through the Civil War, the Great Depression and into the modern age.

Bedside Lamp and Radio
Archibald Smith Plantation Home – Roswell, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Nikon 105mm f/2.8 AF Micro-Nikkor
105mm @ f/22 –  1 sec – ISO 400

Kitchen entertainment

One of the things I will always remember about my grandmother’s kitchen is the ever-present sound of the clock-radio.  The kitchen was the center of the house and my “Meme” was almost always in that room or moving through it.  The radio was on most of that time and she was usually humming or softly singing along with it.  Music or news would stream out as a constant backdrop to daily life and even if you were not really paying attention, it always seemed to be there.

Today, we seem to have digitalized all of our news and entertainment and that space on the counter is no longer reserved for the clock-radio.  I find that I still try to have that music-track for life going in some way even if the radio isn’t there to be turned on.  I feel kind of lonely if I’m not hearing the news on the TV or music streaming from some device.  And sometimes when I have my digital entertainment playing, I remember the sound of that radio and my grandmother singing and feel very much at home.

Kitchen Clock-Radio
Archibald Smith Plantation Home – Roswell, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Nikon 105mm f/2.8 AF Micro-Nikkor
105mm @ f/22 –  0.6 sec – ISO 200

Mamie’s Hat

The Archibald Smith Plantation Home in Roswell, Georgia is a museum of southern life.  The house includes artifacts of the family and servants that made the house and surrounding property a prosperous farm for over 100 years.  One of Roswell’s founding families, the Smiths moved from Savannah to Roswell in 1838 and started work on what would become the Smith Plantation.  The home was sold to the City of Roswell in 1985 and was opened for tours beginning in 1992.

The last of the Smith family to occupy the house were Arthur William Smith, grandson of the founder, and his wife Mary Norvell Smith.  Most of what is on display in the museum is from the time that Arthur and Mary lived in the home from 1940 until the home was sold.

 In her later years, Mary became sick and the family cook, Mamie Cotton moved into the house to assist with Mary’s daily needs.  Mamie lived with and worked for the family for over 50 years up to and beyond their deaths and her room is part of the museum display.  On the headboard of her bed, this hat hangs just waiting for Mamie to come pick it up for a stylish outing.

Mamie’s Hat
Archibald Smith Plantation Home – Roswell, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Nikon 105mm f/2.8 AF Micro-Nikkor
105mm @ f/22 –  2.5 sec – ISO 200

Signs of Spring

Yes it is February but in Atlanta, Spring is just around the corner.  On our trip to the Smith Plantation Home this weekend, you could see the signs already.  Daffodils and Forsythia are blooming as are these shy but beautiful Hellebore.  The flowers tend to point downward so they are not as easily seen as some other garden favorites but they are wonderful to look at up close.

An overcast day may put a damper on my spirits but this was actually pretty nice light for flowers.  You can make out some water drops on the leaves of this plant.  Evidence that there had been some light rain recently.  Getting in close also lets you see the delicate vein patterns on the leaves.  The more you look, the more beauty you can see in nature.

Helleborus ‘Ivory Prince’
Archibald Smith Plantation Home – Roswell, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Nikon 105mm f/2.8 AF Micro-Nikkor
105mm @ f/22 –  1/13 sec – ISO 200

Have a Coke and a Smile

These old glass Coke bottles were sitting on the kitchen counter at the Smith Plantation. At first look, these bottles seemed kind of bland but then I started to play.  With a small aperture, low ISO and side lighting from my ProMaster LED120SS, I got this high-contrast, dramatic image.  Just goes to show that the right lighting can make a huge difference!

Vintage Coca-Cola bottles
Archibald Smith Plantation Home – Roswell, Georgia

Nikon D7100
ProMaster LED120SS light
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Nikon 105mm f/2.8 AF Micro-Nikkor
105mm @ f/22 –  1/4 sec – ISO 200