Dan Lawson’s place Cades Cove

Dan Lawson’s Place is the second oldest of the historic cabins that remain standing in Cades Cove.  Built around 1840, this was the home of the cove’s wealthiest resident.  Only the John Oliver cabin (1822), home of the cove’s first European settler, is older than this one.

Cades Cove was first settled during the 1700’s by Cherokee Indians and is named after a Chief Kade. The first European settlers came during the 1800’s eventually reaching a population of 671 around 1850.

In the 1920’s the residents were forced out when the State of Tennessee gave the Park Commission power to seize the cove properties and make them part of the National Park system.

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
22mm @ f/10 – 1/50 sec – ISO 100

Barnsley Gardens

After visiting the Lindale Mill with Roswell Photographic Society, a few of us went over to get lunch and stroll around Barnsley Gardens.  The Barnsley Resort and Spa in Adairsville, features golf, horseback riding and beautiful grounds to relax in and enjoy.

The ruins of the original Barnsley manor, named “Woodlands” are featured in my image here.  Built in the 1850’s by the wealthy cotton and sea merchant, Godfrey Barnsley, the Italinanate mansion is one of the most memorable feature of the resort.  The story goes that Barnsley built the mansion for his wife Julia who became sick and passed away before the construction was finished.  He felt called by her spirit to finish the building and it became the family residence for several generations before falling into ruin after having been hit by a tornado.

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
44mm @ f/14 – 1/50 sec – ISO 200

A different Lindale Mill

After my visit to the Lindale textile mill with the Roswell Photographic Society, I was introduced to another mill nearby.  A few of the group were going over to Barnsley Gardens after seeing the abandoned mill.  Gittel Price, who had been out to this site previously, said – why don’t we go over to the “Old” mill?  So we set off and went all the way across the main road and stopped again.

The Old Lindale Mill is an antebellum, brick grist mill.  The structure was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993 and is remarkable for being one of only a few surviving mills of this era.  The mill originally built in the 1830’s, was destroyed during the Civil War and then re-built by it’s owner Captain Jacob H. Hoss.  It has been known by several names: Hoss’s Mill, Jones Mill, Silver Creek Mill, and Folly Mill and is now known as the Old Brick Mill.

The place is very peaceful and a great site to visit.  If you should happen to stop here, be careful of the white goose who seems to be the ruler of the mill pond.  You may get chased off if the goose does not think you are showing enough respect!

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
38mm @ f/14 – 1/160 sec – ISO 800

The fate of Textiles

The Textile industry has gone the way of the dinosaur for the most part in the United States.  This is one of the fossils remaining from the era when textile plants churned out cloth for use in our everyday needs.  The Lindale Mill was founded in 1896 by Massachusetts Mill Company and at its peak produced 1/7 of all textiles made in Georgia.

After 105 years of manufacturing textiles in Georgia, the Mill closed in 2001.  It lay abandoned and ignored until 2010 when the current owner purchased the property and began to re-develop the site for use in movie production.  It was wonderful to be able to wander through the old buildings and wonder at what it must have been like when close to 1,400 people once worked here.

The property is now opened for photographers, music video and movie production and individuals who want to see this interesting piece of American industrial history.  You must contact the owner to get in and there is a fee to enter/use the property.  I highly recommend this as a great day trip.

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 10-24mm F/3.5-4.5 Di II
19mm @ f/14 – 0.5 sec – ISO 800

Remembering our Heritage

I have been preparing for the Roswell Photographic Society annual exhibit that is in conjunction with Roswell Heritage Days.  This image is from Barrington Hall, one of the “Big Three” historic homes that were built by the founding families of Roswell.  I was attracted to this spot for a couple of reasons.  The light was interesting – a combination of natural light from a window in the bedroom, and dark areas off to the side.  Also, the antique toy and aged papers on this portable writing desk, made me immediately feel the history associated with these items.

I am so glad that there are places like this where we preserve history.  It would be sad to think that we didn’t care or remember where we have come from and how much we have to be thankful for every day.

Barrington Hall – Roswell, GA
Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
ProMaster LED120SS light
Nikon 105mm f/2.8 AF Micro-Nikkor
105mm @ f/38 –  0.8 sec – ISO 400

Gold doubloons

The Pirate Museum in St Augustine has a second focus which is Treasure.  Though the main draw is the swashbuckling adventures of the pirates, there is much history and many artifacts centered around the booty they sought to claim on the high seas.  This image features some of the recovered coin of the day.

It is very interesting to read and view the stories that they have about how much treasure was pirated and how many shipwrecks occurred in the waters off of Florida.  I’m sure there is still a lot of gold, silver and other precious materials laying along the reefs and on the ocean floor in those waters.  That’s part of the allure that draws so many to view the treasures collected here.  Yo ho, yo ho, a pirates life for me!

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron 16-300 Di II VC PZD Macro
110mm @ f8 –  1/500 sec – ISO 2500

Khanjarli Dagger

This dagger is one of the most interesting artifacts on display in the new Red Sea Pirates exhibit at the Pirate & Treasure Museum in St. Augustine, Florida.  The 17th century Kahnjarli Dagger is from a shipwreck discovered by noted archivist Dr. John De Bry, director of the non-profit Center for Historical Archaeology in Melbourne, Florida.

This exhibit features artifacts and history related to pirates such as Captian Kidd who traveled the “Pirate Round” from the West Indies around Africa into the Red Sea. Most active from the early 1690’s to 1700, pirates risked the journey around the Cape of Good Hope to the Indian Ocean, attacking ships loaded with exotic products of India.

St. Augustine Pirate & Treasure Museum
Nikon D7100
Tamron 16-300 Di II VC PZD Macro
22mm @ f8 –  1/25 sec – ISO 2500