Dan Lawson’s place Cades Cove

Dan Lawson’s Place is the second oldest of the historic cabins that remain standing in Cades Cove.  Built around 1840, this was the home of the cove’s wealthiest resident.  Only the John Oliver cabin (1822), home of the cove’s first European settler, is older than this one.

Cades Cove was first settled during the 1700’s by Cherokee Indians and is named after a Chief Kade. The first European settlers came during the 1800’s eventually reaching a population of 671 around 1850.

In the 1920’s the residents were forced out when the State of Tennessee gave the Park Commission power to seize the cove properties and make them part of the National Park system.

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
22mm @ f/10 – 1/50 sec – ISO 100

Details

Sometimes, it’s the details that are most important.  When visiting Lindale Mill, I spent most of my time looking at the vast, industrial spaces and the interesting light patterns that came in through the windows.  It would have been a pity if I had not also been paying attention to the details.

There were so many interesting small things in this place.  Items like the gears and pipes shown here and all the amazing detail of the texture and color that was all around.  One of my greatest pleasures as a result of being into photography to notice these things.  So often, we pass by the details without paying any attention.  Try to focus on this more often and you will be rewarded with many amazing things that other people miss!

Lindale Mill
Lindale, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Nikon 105mm f/2.8 AF Micro-Nikkor
105mm @ f/22 – 1.3 sec – ISO 800

#LindaleMill #LindaleGA #TextileMill #industrial #machinery #UrbanDecay #texture #detail #decay #abandoned #macro #pipes #gears

Overhead machines

Not sure exactly what this machinery did but it was very interesting to see.  There was obviously some king of process that took textiles or fibers from one end of this room to the other on an overhead track.  Through out the room, there were these silver wheels that must have turned or spun materials.  I’m guessing maybe for drying but that’s only a guess.

This big room was a great spot to watch the sunlight coming in.  The patterns and colors created by the seeming random pattern of painted-out window panes are wonderful.  So much texture, color and light to take in.

Lindale Mill
Lindale, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 10-24mm F/3.5-4.5 Di II
19mm @ f/18 – 1/10 sec – ISO 200

#LindaleMill #LindaleGA #TextileMill #industrial #machinery #UrbanDecay #texture #detail #decay #abandoned #WithMyTamron

Where did I put that file?

Walking through the old Lindale textile mill was a great adventure.  Most of the facility was full of the industrial machinery that made the plant run.  There are still some pieces of the office furniture and equipment that would have been used in running the business.  Items like these old filing cabinets are spread around along with old computers and various other bits and pieces of the company’s business fixtures.

You can imagine how the mill would have been buzzing with activity back in the days when it was in full production.  Now, the buildings are quiet and empty but still very interesting to see.  It is a great piece of history and an excellent source of inspiration for photography.  Hope to get back here before too long.

Lindale Mill
Lindale, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 10-24mm F/3.5-4.5 Di II
19mm @ f/18 – 1/10 sec – ISO 200

#LindaleMill #LindaleGA #TextileMill #industrial #machinery #UrbanDecay #texture #detail #decay #abandoned #WithMyTamron

Smokestacks through the window

This was one of those times when you spot something while just walking around.  I was exploring the Lindale Mill building where they would dye the denim material which was the main product of the mill.  It was a sunny day and, like most of us in the group, I was paying attention to the light coming in through the windows.

When going past this one un-glazed window, I noticed the great view of the main plant with its iconic smokestacks.  The open window with the brick wall painted in the distinctive green color that is though out the mill, made a perfect frame for my image.  I used my wide-angle lens to get the whole of the window and include that great green brick.  I think the finished image looks like a picture of the mill hanging on the wall.  One of those – picture within a picture, kind of things.

Sometimes we plan a great shot and sometimes it kind of just gets presented to you.  The key seems to be keeping your eyes open and being ready when the opportunity arises.

Lindale Mill
Lindale, Georgia

Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 10-24mm F/3.5-4.5 Di II
19mm @ f/18 – 1/10 sec – ISO 200

#LindaleMill #LindaleGA #TextileMill #industrial #machinery #UrbanDecay #texture #detail #decay #abandoned #WithMyTamron

Power Up

I almost used this one for my entry in the RPS contest for leading lines. Through out the Lindale Mill facility, you could see the remnants of power components that ran the plant. Here, fuse boxes are wide open and the conduit lines that would have run power to nearby machines crawl up the walls.

This was an interesting spot to me not only because of the power equipment but also due to the texture provided by the peeling and cracking of the paint peeling off the brick walls.

Lindale Mill
Lindale, Georgia
Nikon D7100
Vanguard Altra Pro 263 AT tripod
Tamron SP 10-24mm F/3.5-4.5 Di II
10mm @ f/22 – 1.3 sec – ISO 800

#LindaleMill #LindaleGA #TextileMill #industrial #machinery #UrbanDecay #texture #detail #fusebox #electrical #SquareD #decay #abandoned #WithMyTamron Field Trip to Lindale Mill Lindale, Georgia Lindale Mill Filming

 

Barnsley Gardens

After visiting the Lindale Mill with Roswell Photographic Society, a few of us went over to get lunch and stroll around Barnsley Gardens.  The Barnsley Resort and Spa in Adairsville, features golf, horseback riding and beautiful grounds to relax in and enjoy.

The ruins of the original Barnsley manor, named “Woodlands” are featured in my image here.  Built in the 1850’s by the wealthy cotton and sea merchant, Godfrey Barnsley, the Italinanate mansion is one of the most memorable feature of the resort.  The story goes that Barnsley built the mansion for his wife Julia who became sick and passed away before the construction was finished.  He felt called by her spirit to finish the building and it became the family residence for several generations before falling into ruin after having been hit by a tornado.

Nikon D7100
Tamron SP 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC
44mm @ f/14 – 1/50 sec – ISO 200